Volume 5, Issue 6, December 2016, Page: 131-136
Die Away Health Workers: The Role of Psychological Factors on Burnout
Fasanmi Samuel Sunday, Department of Psychology, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago-Iwoye, Nigeria
Received: Oct. 26, 2016;       Accepted: Nov. 8, 2016;       Published: Dec. 23, 2016
DOI: 10.11648/j.pbs.20160506.11      View  2816      Downloads  98
Abstract
The study aims at investigating the effect of abusive supervision, interactional justice and supportive workplace supervision burnout among health workers in selected communities in Ogun State, Nigeria. Three hundred and twenty (320) health workers were sampled for the study. A battery of tests on abusive supervision, interactional justice, supportive workplace supervision scale, and employee burnout were used to elicit responses from the participants. The research used 2x2x2 factorial design. Four hypotheses were generated and were tested using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Scheffe’s post-hoc analysis was used to know the direction of the findings. Results revealed that there was a significant main effect of perceived abusive supervision on employee burnout among health workers. Also, there was a significant main effect of interactional justice on employee burnout among health workers. It was also found out that there was a significant interaction effect of supportive workplace supervision, interactional justice, and abusive supervision on employee burnout among health workers. Results were discussed in line with hypotheses. It was suggested that the health establishments can reduce the incidence of employees’ burnout at least through establishing medical teams that perceived their superiors as non abusive.
Keywords
Employee Burnout, Abusive Supervision, Interactional Justice, Supportive Workplace Supervision
To cite this article
Fasanmi Samuel Sunday, Die Away Health Workers: The Role of Psychological Factors on Burnout, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences. Vol. 5, No. 6, 2016, pp. 131-136. doi: 10.11648/j.pbs.20160506.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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